Introduction

In this article, we discuss vitamin e E rich foods. Vitamin E is a group of 8 fat-soluble vitamins that assist stop oxidative pressure in the body and other vitamins in the body.

Sufficient amounts of vitamin E can help preserve heart disease, cancer, and age-related eye deterioration.

Conversely, too much vitamin E from supplements can cause extreme bleeding. Foods with vitamin E, as listed below, are deemed safe and healthy.

Fortunately, vitamin E is popular in food. As a result, it is unlikely to become deficient unless your nutrient absorption is reduced. However, everyone should try to eat plenty of whole foods rich in vitamin E.

In the United States, 15 mg of vitamin E per day is supposed adequate for the vast preponderance of adults. This daily value (DV) has been selected as a source of nutritional labels in the USA.

Foods rich in vitamin E include sunflower seeds, almonds, spinach, avocados, kiwi, trout, shrimp, olive, wheat germ oil, and broccoli. The current daily value (DV) for vitamin E is 15 mg.

Vitamin E is a group of essential antioxidants that protect your cells from oxidative stress. Adequate levels of vitamin E are crucial for normal body function.

If you don’t get enough, you may become more susceptible to infections. Experience decreased vision or muscle weakness.

This article also contains five lists of foods rich in vitamin E, classified by the food group.

1. Asparagus (cooked)

4 spears: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

100 gms: 1.6 mg (10% DV)

2. Swiss Chard

1 leaf: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

100 gms: 1.9 mg (14% DV)

3. Collards 

1 cup: 0.8 mg (6% DV)

100 gms: 2.4 mg (15% DV)

4. Spinach 

1 cup: 0.6 mg (4% DV)

100 gms: 2 mg (14% DV)

5. Mamey Sapote 

Half fruit: 5.90 mg (38% DV)

100 gms: 2.2 mg (14% DV)

6. Avocado

Half fruit: 2.2 mg (15% DV)

100 gms: 2.1 mg (14% DV)

7. Mango

Half fruit: 1.6 mg (10% DV)

100 gms: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

8. Kiwifruit 

1 medium fruit: 1.0 mg (7% DV)

100 gms: 1.5 mg (11% DV)

9. Blackberries

Half cup: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

100 gms: 1.3 mg (8% DV)

10. Brazil Nuts 

1 ounce: 1.5 mg (12% DV)

100 gms: 5.7 mg (38% DV)

11. Pistachios 

1 ounce: 0.7 mg (5% DV)

100 gms: 2.9 mg (18% DV)

12. Pumpkin Seeds

1 ounce: 0.8 mg (4% DV)

100 gms: 2.1 mg (14% DV)

13. Pecans 

1 ounce: 0.5 mg (3% DV)

100 gms: 1.5 mg (9% DV)

14. Cashew Nuts 

1 ounce: 0.3 mg (3% DV)

100 gms: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

15. Crayfish 

3 ounces: 1.4 mg (8% DV)

100 gms: 1.5 mg (11% DV)

16. Fish Roe

1 tbs poon: 1.0 mg (7% DV)

100 gms: 7.0 mg (48% DV)

17. Octopus 

3 ounces: 1.01 mg (8% DV)

100 gms: 1.2 mg (8% DV)

18. Lobster 

3 ounces: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

100 gms: 1.01 mg (8% DV)

19. Cod 

1 ounce: 0.8 mg (6% DV)

100 gms: 2.9 mg (19% DV)

20. Wheat Germ Oil

1 tbs spoon: 20 mg (136% DV)

100 gms: 148 mg (996% DV)

21. Sunflower Seeds 

1 ounce: 10 mg (66% DV)

100 gms: 35 mg (235% DV)

22. Almonds 

1 ounce: 7.4 mg (49% DV)

100 gms: 26 mg (171% DV)

23. Hazelnut Oil 

1 tablespoon: 6.4 mg (43% DV)

100 gms: 47 mg (315% DV)

24. Mamey Sapote

Half fruit: 5.9 mg (39% DV)

100 gms: 2.2 mg (14% DV)

25. Sunflower Oil 

1 tbs spoon: 5.7 mg (37% DV)

100 gms: 41 mg (277% DV)

26. Almond Oil

1 tbs spoon: 5.3 mg (36% DV)

100 gms: 39 mg (262% DV)

27. Hazelnuts

1 ounce: 4.3 mg (29% DV)

100 gms: 14 mg (100% DV)

28. Abalone 

3 ounces: 3.4 mg (23% DV)

100 gms: 4.0 mg (27% DV)

29. Pine Nuts 

1 ounce: 2.7 mg (18% DV)

100 gms: 9.4 mg (62% DV)

30.  Beet Greens

Half cup: 1.4 mg (9% DV)

100 gms: 1.8 mg (11% DV

Advantages Of Vitamin E

Researchers believe that antioxidants, including vitamin E, can help neutralize free radicals and their effects by giving them an electron and making them less reactive.

According to the study, Vitamin E can also develop skin health by decreasing collagen analysis and free radical loss.

In addition to its role as an antioxidant, vitamin E also helps support the immune system.

Some research also shows that vitamin E can increase the expression of certain enzymes that dilate blood vessels. More full blood vessels are less likely to develop dangerous blood clots.

Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin, so people should consume foods rich in vitamin E with fat to improve absorption.

Here are some of the diseases that vitamin E protect from us:

  • Reduced risk of heart disease.
  • Decreased risk of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig’s disease).
  • It improved eye health.
  • Chronic inflammation relief.
  • Reduced risk of dementia.
  • Lowers the risk of cancer.

Outlook

Vitamin E is an important antioxidant that can help preserve cells from free drastic damage.

Getting enough vitamin E can also help reduce the risk of a mixture of conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and cognitive decline.

However, research does not recommend using vitamin E supplements to decrease the chance of chronic diseases. Food is the best source of Vitamin E.

Vitamin E is found in almost all foods to some degree. For this reason, most people are not at risk for deficiency.

However, disorders that affect fat absorption, such as cystic fibrosis or liver disease, can lead to deficiency over time, especially if your diet is low in vitamin E.

Many foods carry some vitamin E, but nuts, seeds, and some oils have the most basic levels. Anyone concerned about their vitamin E levels can speak to a doctor or nutritionist to increase their intake.